Course Catalog of Electronics and Communications Engineering

Idea of signals and systems; Digital and Analog sources and systems; Block diagram of a basic communication system and functions of its different parts; Basics of the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves; Formal definition of information; Fourier series; Idea of spectra of signals; Information data rate and bandwidth of a signal; Channel capacity and ideal communication systems; Basic idea of coding; Concept of telephone switching systems; Basics of telecommunication networks; Idea of different types of telecommunication systems (Wireless, Optical Fiber and Satellite Communications).

Credits: 1; Prerequisite: None.

Recommended Textbook: This is a very basic course and there is no standard textbook for it. Course materials will be collected from various basic texts.

Reference Book: Signals & Systems, S. Haykin and B. Van Veen, Wiley & Sons.

Introduction to HTML: Mark up tags for basic document layout: paragraph tags, headings, ordered and unordered lists, definition lists, nested lists · Tables: cell alignment · Visual effects: logical and visual styles, special characters · Hypertext links: directory paths, links to other documents, links inside documents · Including multimedia objects: images, sound and video.

Programming Language: Concept of programming language and its classification; Programming logic and flow Chart; Structured Programming using C – Constants, variables and data types, arithmetic and logical operation, loops and decision making, user-defined functions, character and strings, arrays, pointers, structures and unions, file management, graphics programming.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: None.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. HTML: The Complete Reference, Thomas A. Powell, Osborne /McGraw- Hill.
  2. Programming in ANSI C, E. Balagurusamy, McGraw-Hill Education.

Reference Book: Schaum’s Outlines Programming with C, Byron Gottfried, McGraw-Hill.

DC Circuit: Fundamental electrical concepts and measuring units, D.C. voltage, current, resistance and power. Introduction to circuit theory and Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s current and voltage laws. Simple resistive circuits: Series and parallel circuits, voltage and current division, Wye-Delta transformation. Various techniques for solving circuit problems: loop and node analysis. Network theorems: Superposition theorem, Source transformation, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems with their applications in circuits having independent and dependent sources; maximum power transfer and reciprocity theorem. Energy storage elements: Inductors and capacitors, series parallel combination of inductors and capacitors. Responses of RL, RC and RLC circuits to natural and step responses.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credit: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Pre-requisite: None.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Introduction to Electric Circuits, RC. Dorf, John Wiley.
  2. Introduction to Electrical Circuits, Nilsson, Addison-Wesley.

Reference Book: Fundamentals of Electrical Circuits -Charles K. Alexander -Matthew N. O. Sadiku

Basic characteristics of sinusoidal functions. Forced response of first order circuits to sinusoidal excitation. Instantaneous, average and reactive power due to sinusoidal excitation, effective values and power factor. Complex exponential forcing functions, phasors, impedance and admittance. Basic circuit laws for AC circuits. Nodal and mesh analysis, network theorems for AC circuits. Magnetically coupled circuits. Balanced and unbalanced three phase circuits, power calculation. Series and parallel resonance.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 107.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Introduction to Electric Circuits, RC. Dorf, John Wiley.
  2. Introduction to Electrical Circuits, Nilsson, Addison-Wesley.

Reference Book: Engineering Circuit Analysis, Hayt & Kemmerly, McGraw Hill.

Diode: physical operation, terminal characteristics, circuit analysis, and applications – rectifier, clipper, clamper, Zener diode. MOSFET: physical operations, terminal characteristics, threshold voltage, body effect, early effect, biasing, amplifier configurations, small and large signal model, and frequency response. Op-Amp: ideal op-amp, inverter, non-inverter, difference amplifier, integrator, differentiator, and weighted summer. Open and closed loop gain, large signal operation, DC imperfection, and frequency response.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Pre-requisite: ETE 207.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Microelectronic Circuits and Devices, M.N. Horenstein, Prentice Hall.
  2. The Art of Electronics, P. Horowitz and W. Hill, Cambridge University Press.

Reference Book: Microelectronic Circuits, Sedra and Smith, Saunder’s College Publishing.

MOS differential amplifier: small signal equivalent circuit, high frequency response, active load, and CMRR. Introduction to multistage amplifiers. Feedback: concept, properties of negative feedback, shunt and series topologies, and stability. Filters: transmission function, Butterworth, Chebychev, 1st and 2nd order filter. Introduction to active filters. Signal Generators: sinusoidal oscillators, Wien bridge, and LC-crystal oscillator. BJT: physical operation, terminal characteristics, biasing, small and large signal model. Classification of power amplifiers: class A, AB, B, power conversion efficiency. Integrated circuits: current sources, current mirrors, small signal, and high frequency analysis. Introduction to cascade amplifiers and advanced mirror circuits.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 212.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Microelectronic Circuits and Devices, M.N. Horenstein, Prentice Hall.
  2. The Art of Electronics, P. Horowitz and W. Hill, Cambridge University Press.

Reference Book: Microelectronic Circuits, Sedra and Smith, Saunder’s College Publishing.

Signals and their properties; Basic operations on signals; Different types of signals; Relation between signals and systems; Linear Time-Invariant Systems: Introduction; Convolution: Impulse Response Representation for LTI Systems; Properties of the Impulse Response Representation for LTI Systems; Differential and Difference Equation Representations for LTI Systems; Block Diagram Representations; State Variable Descriptions for LTI Systems. Fourier Representations for Signals (both continuous-time and discrete-time). Application of Fourier analysis in signals. The Laplace Transform; Transform Analysis of Systems; Applications of Laplace Transform.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: MAT 205.

Recommended Textbook: Signals & Systems, S. Haykin and B. Van Veen, Wiley & Sons.

Reference Book: Signals & Systems, Alan V. Oppenheim, Prentice Hall.

Atomic structure of crystals; Classical waves; quantization; wave-particle duality; Elementary quantum mechanics of the electron; Chemical bonding and the periodic table; The free electron theory of metal; Band theory of solids; Semiconductors: Doping, holes, statistics, transport, and excess carriers; Introduction to semiconductor device concepts; Dielectric properties of materials; Magnetic properties of materials; Superconducting properties of materials.

Credits: 3; Pre-requisite: PHY 209.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Electronic Materials & Devices: D.K. Ferry and J.P. Bird, Academic Press, 2001.
  2. Solid State and Semiconductor Physics, J. McKelvey, 1982.
  3. Electronic Properties of Materials: Rolf E. Hummel, Springer, 2001.

Reference Book:

  1. Lectures on the Electrical Properties of Materials, 5th edition, Oxford University Press, New York, 1988.
  2. Introduction to the Electronic Properties of Materials: David Jiles, CRC Press.

Covers, at an introductory level, a variety of topics such as cellular and molecular therapies, novel medical devices to diagnose and treat disease, engineering and computational models of the body, genomics, biomechanics, cell signaling, and tissue engineering. Application of statics and dynamics to simple force analyses of the musculoskeletal system.  Introduction to the fundamentals of strength of materials; Biomechanics of soft and hard tissues: microstructure and mechanical properties.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: PHY 209.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Introduction to Bioengineering: Edited by Y.C. Fung, World Scientific.
  2. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering: Enderle, Blanchard, and Bronzino, Academic Press, 2000.

Reference Book: Introduction to Bioengineering: Edited by S.A. Berger, E.W. Doldsmith and E.R. Lewis, Oxford University Press.

Introduction, Mass and Energy Fundamentals, Physical Chemistry and Principles, Organic Chemistry, Microbiology and Microbial Growth, Erosion Control and Storm-water Management, Water Quality, Water Treatment, Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Air Pollution, Global Events.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: CHE 109, PHY 109.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Introduction to Environmental Engineering: M.L. Davis and D.A.

Cornwell, McGraw-Hill, 2006.

  1. Introduction to Environmental Engineering and Science: G.M. Masters, Prentice-Hall, 1998.

Reference Book: Introduction to Environmental Engineering: P.A. Vesilind and S.M. Morgan, Brooks/Cole Pub. Co., 2003.

Importance of renewable energy, sources: Statistics regarding solar radiation and wind speed; Insulation; geographical distribution, atmospheric factors, measurements; Solar cell: principle of operation, spectral response, factors affecting conversion efficiency, I-V characteristics, maximum power output, PV modules and arrays, stationary and tracking, PV systems: stand alone, battery storage, inverter interfaces with grid; Wind turbine generators: types, operational characteristics, cut-in and cut-out speed, control, grid interfacing, AC-DC-AC link.

Credits : 3; Pre-requisite: ETE 219.

Principles, modeling, interfacing and signal conditioning of motion sensors and actuators; hardware-in-the-loop simulation and rapid prototyping of real-time closed-loop computer control of electromechanical systems; modeling, analysis and identification of discrete-time or samples-data dynamic systems; commonly used digital controller design methods; introduction to nonlinear effects and their compensation in mechatronic systems.

Credits : 3; Pre-requisite: ETE 216

Introduction to computer and telecommunication networks, types of switching- circuit message and packet, transmission media characteristics, data communication principles – asynchronous and synchronous, layered architecture for computer networks, 7 layer OSI network model, standards for different layers, RS-232 C, X. 21. HDLC, X. 25 TCP/IP etc. network topologies, WAN, MAN, Intranet and LAN technology, IEEE 802 standards, ISDN & B-ISDN, frame relay and ATM network, traffic theory and network performance.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prequisite: ETE 101, ETE 105.

Recommended Textbook: Computer Networks, Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book: Data and Computer Communications, Stallings, MacMillan.

Electromagnetism: Orthogonal Curvilinear co-ordinates (Rectangular, Cylindrical and Spherical); Laplace’s and Poisson’s equations, method of images, energy of an electrostatic system; Vector magnetic potential, energy of magnetostatic system, mechanical forces and torques in electric and magnetic fields, solutions to static field problems; solution to Laplace’s equations.

Electrodynamics: Maxwell’s equations, displacement current, equation of continuity, boundary condition; Propagation of uniform plane waves in perfect dielectric and in lossy medium, reflection, refraction, phase and group velocities, transmission line: evaluation of line parameters, design concepts, cutoff frequency, attenuation, dispersion, power handling capacity, traveling waves, standing waves, Smith chart and matching techniques, pulse propagation, radiation concept: elementary dipole, half-wave dipole, radiation patterns, gain, pattern multiplication, basic antennas.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: MAT 205

Recommended Textbook:

Engineering Electromagnetics, W.H. Hyat, McGraw-Hill.

Reference Book: Field and Wave Electromagnetics, D.KK. Cheng, Addison Wesley.

Idea of Number systems; Binary Logic – Basic Boolean operators (AND, OR, NOT); Boolean algebra and logic circuits: De Morgan’s Laws; Further Boolean operators (XOR, NAND, NOR); Switching algebra; Minimizing functions using maps and combinational circuit analysis. Different logic families, TTL, ECL, NMOS, CMOS, pass transistor logic, combinational logic circuits:- adders/subtractor, demultiplexers, encoders, decoders, ROMs, PLAs etc. sequential logic circuits:- flip flops and latches, shifters, counters, finite state machine – state transition diagrams and state transition tables, memory elements:- ROM, PROM, RAM-SRAM, DRAM. Introduction to VERILOG and FPGA.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 214.

Recommended Textbook: Digital Design, M.M. Mano, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book:  Digital Fundamentals, T.L. Floyd, Prentice Hall.

Stochastic Processes and Signals: Introduction; Definition of random processes and signals; Autocorrelation and cross correlation of random signals; Transmission of a random signal through a linear filter; Power spectral density functions of random signals; White noise; Stationarity; Ergodicity; Gaussian and Poisson processes; Narrow-band noise; Sine wave plus narrow-band noise. Continuous Wave Modulation and Noise: Introduction, Amplitude modulation and demodulation; frequency modulation and demodulation; Frequency-division multiplexing (FDM); Angle modulation; Noise in CW modulation systems; Noise in linear receivers; Noise in AM receivers; Noise in FM receivers; Phase-locked loop; Nonlinear effects in FM systems; Receiver model; Noise in DSB-SC receivers; Noise in SSB receivers; Noise in AM receivers; Noise in FM receivers. Pulse Modulation: Sampling process; Pulse-amplitude modulation; Time division multiplexing; Pulse-position modulation; Bandwidth-noise tradeoff; The quantization process; Pulse-code modulation; Noise consideration in PCM systems; Digital multiplexers; Linear prediction; Differential PCM; Delta modulation; Adaptive DPCM.

Signal Space Analysis: Geometric representation of signals; Conversion of the continuous AWGN channel into a vector channel; Likelihood functions; Coherent detection of signals in noise; Correlation receiver; Probability of error.

Credit: 3; Prerequisite: ETE 216.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Communications System, Simon Haykin, Wiley.
  2. Modern Digital & Analog Communication Systems, Lathi.

Reference Book:  Digital Communications, John J. Proakis, McGraw Hill.

Baseband Signal Transmission: Power spectral density of different line codes; The matched filter, properties of the matched filter; Error rate due to noise; Intersymbol interference; Nyquist’s criterion for distorsionless baseband binary transmission; Correlative level coding; Baseband M-ary PAM transmission; Digital subscriber lines; Optimum linear receiver; Adaptive equalization.

Passband Signal Transmission: Passband transmission model; Hierarchy of digital modulation techniques; Coherent binary amplitude-shift keying (ASK); Coherent binary phase-shift keying (PSK); Coherent binary frequency-shift keying (FSK); Coherent quadriphase-shift keying (QPSK); Coherent minimum phase-shift keying (MSK); Noncoherent orthogonal modulation; Noncoherent binary FSK; Differential PSK (DPSK); M-ary PSK; M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM); Carrierless amplitude/phase (CAP) modulation; M-ary FSK; Power spectra; Bandwidth efficiency; Synchronization; Multichannel modulation and the idea of OFDM.

Multiple Access Techniques: FDMA, TDMA, Concept of Spread-Spectrum & CDMA.

The Course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 312.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Communication Systems, Simon Haykin, Wiley.
  2. Modern Digital & Analog Communication Systems, Lathi.

Reference Book:  Digital Communications, John J. Proakis, McGraw Hill.

Microprocessor and its Architecture: Internal microprocessor architecture, real mode memory addressing, protected mode memory addressing, memory paging. Addressing Modes: Data addressing modes, program memory addressing modes, stack memory-addressing modes. Data Movement Instructions: MOV, PUSH/POP, load effective addresses, string data transfer, miscellaneous data transfer instructions, segment override prefix, assembler. Arithmetic, Logic and Program Control Instructions: Arithmetic operations, BCD and ASCII arithmetic, basic logic instructions, shift and rotate, string comparisons, the jump group, controlling the flow of assembly language program, procedures, interrupts, machine control instructions. Programming in Microprocessor: Modular programming, using keyboard and video display, data conversions, disk files. 8086/8088 Hardware Specifications: Pin outs and pin functions, clock generators, bus buffering and latching, bus timing, ready and the wait state, minimum mode and maximum mode. Peripheral Interfacing: Parallel versus serial transmission, synchronous and asynchronous serial data transmission, interfacing of hexadecimal keyboard and display unit, CRT terminal interfacing, printer interface, floppy disk interface, DMA controllers. 80186, 80286, 80386, 80486, Pentium and Pentium Pro Microprocessors: Introduction, memory management, special features.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prequisite: ETE 311.

Recommended Textbook: System Design with MC68020, MC69040. 32-bit Microprocessors, A. Noor, Van Nostrand Reinhold.

Reference Book: The Inter Microprocessors 8088/8088, 80186, 80286, 80386 and 80486: Architecture, Programming and Interfacing Techniques, MacMillan.

The z-Transform; Properties of the Region of Convergence; Properties of the z-Transform; Inversion of the z-Transform; Transform Analysis of LTI Systems; Signal representation using unitary transforms, DFT, DCT, Haar and Walsh Hadamard transform, properties of DFT, circular convolution, linear convolution using DFT, overlap add and save methods, FFT, filter structures for IIR and FIR filters, direct form I and II, parallel and cascade forms, frequency sampling structure for FIR filters, linear phase FIR filters, digital filter design techniques, IIR filter design by impulse invariance and bilinear transformation, transformation of digital filters, FIR filter design using windows, MATLAB based examples, introduction to multirate DSP, decimation and interpolation, polyphase decomposition, uniform DFT filter banks, quadrature mirror filters and perfect reconstruction, introduction to finite register length effects on digital filter performance, spectral estimation.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credit: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 216.

Recommended Textbook: Digital Signal Processing, John G. Proakis, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book: Signals and Systems, Ziemer, Tranter and Fanin, Prentice Hall/MacMillan.

Information Theory: Uncertainty, information and entropy; Source coding theorem; Discrete memoryless channels; Mutual information; Channel capacity; Channel coding theorem; Differential entropy and mutual information for continuous ensembles; Information capacity theorem; Rate distortion theory.

Error Control Coding: Introduction to error control coding; Review of elements of linear algebra and set theory; Block coding and decoding – algebraic; Cyclic and RS codes; Performance of block codes; Convolution coding and decoding; Types of codes and their properties; Majority logic; Sequential and Viterbi decoding; Interleaving; Multi-stage coding techniques; Punctured and Turbo codes; TCM; System application examples; Idea of cryptography.

Credits: 3; Prequisite: ETE 314.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Communication Systems, Simon Haykins, Wiley.
  2. Modern Digital & Analog Communication Systems, Lathi.

Reference Book:  Digital Communications,  John J. Proakis, McGraw-Hill.

Introduction – Modeling of energy-based systems. Modeling the structure of design problems – Influence diagrams, Modeling Design Objectives, What is modeling and Simulation? Modeling of energy-based systems – The Modelica Language, Evaluation and comparison of continuous-time M&S software, Solving differential (algebraic) equations, Debugging Modelica Models. Modeling uncertainty – Sources and types of uncertainty, Representation of uncertainty, Computing with uncertainty information, Sensitivity Analysis, The Method of Morris.

Modeling preferences – Value functions and trade-offs under certainty, Utility theory, Multi-attribute utility theory, The role of optimization in design, Information Economics – trade-offs between (design) process and system objectives

Selected Topics – Information Modeling for Systems Engineering – SysML.

Credits: 0 (Theory)+1(Lab)=1; Prerequisite:  Up to all ETE 300 level courses, ETE 350.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Introduction to Systems Engineering, A.P. Sage, J.E. Armstrong Jr. Wiley & Sons, 2000. (ISBN: 0471027669).
  2. Continuous System Simulation, F.E. Cellier and E. Kofman, Springer, 2006. (ISBN: 0387261028).
  3. Simulation with Arena, 3rd edition, W. Kelton, R. Sadowski, D. Sturrock, McGraw-Hill, 2003. (ISBN: 0072919817).

Reference Book:  Principles of Object-Oriented Modeling and Simulation with Modelica 2.1,

Peter Fritzson, Wiley-IEEE Computer Society Press, 2003. (ISBN: 047147163).

Introduction to Energy Bands, Metals, Semiconductors, and Insulators; Electrons and Holes, Effective Mass; Intrinsic Material, Extrinsic Material; Distribution functions, Fermi-Dirac Statistics, Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, and Carrier Concentrations – The Fermi level, Electron and Hole Concentrations at Equilibrium; Temperature Dependence of Carrier Concentrations Compensation and Space Charge Neutrality; Conductivity and Mobility, Drift and Resistance; Diffusion Processes, Diffusion and Drift of Carriers, Built-in Fields, Diffusion and Recombination, Steady State Carrier Injection;  Diffusion Length. p-n Junctions: Equilibrium Condition, The Contact Potential, Equilibrium Fermi Levels, Space Charge at a Junction; Forward- and Reverse-Biased Junctions; Steady State Conditions Qualitative Description of Current Flow at a Junction; Carrier Injection; Reverse Bias, Reverse-Bias Breakdown,  Zener Breakdown, Avalanche Breakdown; Capacitance of p-n Junctions; Schottky Barrier Rectifying Contacts, Ohmic Contacts, Typical Schottky Barriers, narrow-base diode; The Ideal MOS Capacitor, Effects of Real Surfaces (Flatband voltage), Threshold Voltage, MOS Capacitance-Voltage Analysis; Output Characteristics, Transfer Characteristics; Control of Threshold Voltage; BJT Fundamentals, common-emitter amplifier and small-signal circuit, Ebers Moll equation; Basic Operation.

Credits: 3; Pre-requisite: ETE 219.

Recommended Textbook: Solid State Electronic Devices, B.G. Streetman, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book:  Semiconductor Devices, M.J. Cooke, Prentice Hall.

Introduction to the VLSI design flow, unit processes in VLSI (oxidation, diffusion, lithography, ion implantation, metallization, etc,), isolation schemes, bipolar and CMOS processing, analog ICs CMOS OPAMP static and dynamic CMOS/BICMOS and logic PLA circuits, SRAM, DRAM, introduction to mixed signal ICs, basic design methodologies: full custom and semi-custom design, ASIC field programmable devices, optimization at various levels, (algorithmic architecture, logic, circuit, device), simulation and testing, design rules, floor planning, placement, routing and layout, mask making procedure, parasities and other non-idealities, timing issues, clock skew etc, importance of device modeling.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 219. Recommended Textbook: Basic VLSI Design, Pucknell Eshraghian, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book: Design of VLSI Systems-A Practical Introduction, Linda E.M. Brackenbury, Scholium International, Inc.

Properties of Light: Particle and wave nature of light; polarization, interference, diffraction and blackbody radiation.

Optical Properties of Semiconductors: Direct and indirect band-gap materials; radiative and non-radiative recombination; optical absorption; photo generation of excess carriers; minority carrier life time; luminescence and quantum efficiency in radiation.Light Emitting Diode (LED): Principles; materials for visible and infrared LED; internal and external efficiency; loss mechanism; structure and coupling of optical fibers.

Stimulated Emission & Light Amplification: Spontaneous and stimulated emission; Einstein’s relations; population inversion; absorption of radiation; optical feedback and threshold conditions.

Semiconductor Lasers: Population inversion in degenerate semiconductors; laser cavity; operating wavelength; threshold current density; power output; optical and electrical confinement; introduction to quantum well lasers.

Photo-Detectors: Photoconductors; junction photo-detectors; PIN detectors; avalanche photodiodes and phototransistors. Solar Cells: Solar energy and spectrum; silicon and schottky solar cells.

Modulation of Light: Phase and amplitude modulation; electro-optic effect; acousto-optic effect and magneto-optic devices.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 219.

Recommended Textbook: Optoelectronics: An Introduction, Vinod K. Sharma, P.C. Mathur, K.N. Tripathi, Avinash Kapoor, BS Publications.

Reference Book: Optoelectronics for Data Communication Description: San Diego, Academic  Press.

Introduction. Combinational circuit design with programmable logic devices, implementation of high speed multipliers. Design of modular sequential logic circuits, implementation of digital fractional rate multipliers. State machine design, Mealy and Moore machines. Asynchronous circuit design. Design, modeling and verification of complex digital systems. Modem design methodologies for logic design: Data path and control design, algorithmic state machines integration of data and control. Logic circuit testing and testable design. Modern tools for the design and testing of digital systems. Digital design case studies.

The course includes lab works based on the concepts introduced.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Pre-requisites: ETE 311.

Recommended Textbook: Digital Design, M.M. Mano, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book:  Integrated Circuits in Digital Electronics, Barna, John Wiley.

Lattice Vibration: Simple harmonic model; dispersion relation; acoustic and optical phonons.

Band Structure of Solids: Isotropic and anisotropic crystals; free electron theory of metals; density of states; band diagram and effective masses of different semiconductors and alloys.

Scattering Theory: Review of classical theory; Born approximation and partial wave analysis; Scattering and relaxation. Approximation Methods: Different types of approximation methods including perturbation theory. Fermi-Golden rule; scattering rates of different processes; scattering mechanisms in different semiconductors; mobility.

Different Carrier Transport Models: Drift-diffusion theory; ambipolar transport; hydrodynamic model; Boltzmann-transport equation; quantum mechanical models. Low-Dimensional Systems: Fundamentals of two, one and zero dimensional semiconductor nanostructures; Density of states for different dimensions; Tunneling and transmission probabilities; Quantum well, super-lattice, quantum wire, quantum dot; Ballistic transport; Quantum Hall effect.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ETE 219.

Recommended Textbook: Quantum Phenomena in Clusters and Nanostructures, Shiv N. Khanna, Albert W. Castleman, Springer.

Reference Book:  Physics of Semiconductor Devices, S.M. SZE, John Wiley and Sons.

Substrate materials: Crystal growth and wafer preparation, epitaxial growth technique, molecular beam epitaxy, chemical vapor phase epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Doping techniques: Diffusion and ion implantation. Growth and deposition of dielectric layers: Thermal oxidation, CVD, plasma CVD, sputtering and silicon-nitride growth. Etching: Wet chemical etching, silicon and GaAs etching, anisotropic etching, selective etching, dry physical etching, ion beam etching, sputtering etching and reactive ion etching. Cleaning: Surface cleaning, organic cleaning and RCA cleaning. Lithography: Photo-reactive materials, pattern generation, pattern transfer and metallization. Discrete device fabrication: Diode, transistor, resistor and capacitor. Integrated circuit fabrication: Isolation – pn junction isolation, mesa isolation and oxide isolation; p-channel and n-channel MOSFETs, complimentary MOSFETs and silicon on insulator devices. Testing, bonding and packaging.

Credits: 3; Pre-requisites: ETE 219.

Recommended Textbook: Fundamentals of Solid State Electronics, C.T. Sah, World Scientific.

Reference Book:  Semiconductor Devices, M.J. Cooke, Prentice Hall.

Review of FET Amplifiers: active and passive loads and frequency limitation.

Current Mirror: Basic, cascade and active current mirror.

Differential Amplifier: Introduction, large and small signal analysis, common mode analysis and differential amplifier with active load. Noise: Introduction to noise, types, representation in circuits, noise in single stage and differential amplifiers and bandwidth.

Band-Gap References: Supply voltage independent biasing, temperature independent biasing, proportional to absolute temperature current generation and constant transconductance biasing.

Switch Capacitor Circuits: Sampling switches, switched capacitor circuits including unity gain buffer, amplifier and integrator.

Phase Locked Loop (PLL): Introduction, basic PLL and charge pumped PLL.

The course includes lab works based on the concepts introduced.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Pre-requisites: ETE 214.

Recommended Textbook: Microelectronic Circuits and Devices, M.N. Horenstein, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book:  Integrated Circuits, K.R. Botkar, Khanna Publishers.

Key nanofabrication techniques, including scanned probe techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), molecular self-assembly, nanoimprint and soft lithography, DNA-based assembly, and MEMS-based multi-probe systems. This will be followed by coverage of the basic building blocks for nanotechnology, including molecules, carbon nanotubes, semiconducting nanowires and quantum dots. The last part of the course will cover the nanotechnology applications that are currently being realized or are being actively pursued. These applications are in the areas of materials, devices for electronic, chemical and biological sensing applications and systems such as future electronic integrated circuits that couple new nanotechnologies with silicon technology.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ETE 219

Recommended Textbook: Fundamentals of Solid State Electronics, C.T. Sah, World Scientific

Reference Book:  Semiconductor Devices, M.J. Cooke, Prentice Hall.

Power Semiconductor Switches and Triggering Devices: BJT, MOSFET, SCR, IGBT, GTO, TRIAC, UJT and DIAC.

Rectifiers: Uncontrolled and controlled single phase and three phase.

Regulated Power Supplies: Linear-series and shunt, switching buck, buck boost, boost and Cuk regulators.

AC Voltage Controllers: single and three phase. Choppers. DC motor control. Single phase cycloconverter.

Inverters: Single phase and three phase voltage and current source. AC motor control. Stepper motor control. Resonance inverters. Pulse width modulation control of static converters.

The course includes lab works based on the concepts introduced.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Pre-requisites: ETE 311.

Recommended Textbook: Power Electronics: Circuits, Devices and Applications, H. Rashid,

Prentice Hall.

Reference Book: Power Electronics: Principles and Applications, Vithayathil, McGraw Hill.

Introduction to Embedded Systems; Specification and Modeling of Embedded Systems; Components of Embedded Systems; Time in Embedded Systems; Hardware-Software Partitioning; Control Systems; Validation of Programmable Embedded Systems; Early Estimation Techniques; Compilation for Embedded Systems; Reconfigurable Computing in Embedded Systems.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 311.

Recommended Textbook: Embedded Systems Architecture: A Comprehensive Guide for Engineers and Programmers, Tammy Noergaard, Newnes.

Reference Book: Embedded Systems: From Hardware to Applications, P. Raghavan, Auerbach.

The human body; an overview, forms of mammalian cells, bioelectricity; Electro conduction system of the heart; Bio-electric amplifiers; carrier amplifiers; optically coupled amplifiers; current loading type isolation amplifiers; chopper amplifiers; differential chopper amplifiers, Electrocardiograph (ECG) waveform; ECG preamplifiers, defibrillator, blood pressure measurements and electronic manometry pressure transducers, pressure amplifiers, systolic, diastolic and mean director circuits, practical problems in pressure monitoring; Blood flow measurements; plethysmography, vector cardiography, cardioverter and pacemakers; Measurement of human brain parameters; cerebral angiography, cronical  X-ray, brain scans; Tomography and ultra sonogram; Electroencephalography (EEG); electrode, frequency bands, EEG patterns and EEG preamplifiers, ICU/ CCU central monitoring system.

The course includes lab works based on the concepts introduced.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisites: ETE 311.

Recommended Textbook: Introduction to Biomedical Engineering, John D. Enderle, Susan M. Blanchad, Academic Press.

Reference Book: Introduction to Biomedical  Engineering , Michael M. Domach, Prentice Hall.

Linear System Models: Transfer function; block diagram and signal flow graph (SFG).

State Variables: SFG to state variables; transfer function to state variable and state variable to transfer function.

Feedback Control System: Closed loop systems; parameter sensitivity; transient characteristics of control systems; effect of third pole and zero on the system response and system types and steady state error; Routh stability criterion; root locus method and frequency response method.

Design of Feedback Control System: Controllability and observability; root locus; frequency response and state variable methods.

Digital Control Systems: Introduction; sampled data systems; stability analysis in Z-domain; solving and analyzing various problems by using MATLAB software.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credit: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 322.

Recommended Textbook: Modern Control Systems, Dorf & Bishop, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book: Schaum’s Outline of Feedback and Control Systems, Allen J. Stubberud, Ivan J. Williams, Joseph J. DiStefano, McGraw Hill.

Review of Maxwell’s equations and transmission line theory, circuit models. Microwave network analysis: Scattering matrices and mulitport analysis techniques. Impedance Matching: Design of matching networks including lumped elements, stubs and transmission line sections, circuit tuning. Passive Components: Theory of operation, practical design and implementation of power dividers, directional couplers and hybrids, resonators as well as system applications of these devices. Noise and distortion in RF Systems: Effects on channel capacity. Active Circuits: Theory of operation, practical design and implementation of amplifiers for low-noise or power applications, detectors, mixers;  Microwave Systems: Receiver and system performance calculations, RF link analysis, end-to-end microwave system (“the physical channel”) analysis.

Applications: Antennas – loop and helical antennas, folded dipole and Yagi-uda array: Babinet s principle: slot, horn and complimentary antennas, radiation from apertures, ridge and corrugated horns, GTD, reflector antennas, baluns, antenna for mobile communication, antenna measurements. Propagation and microwave filter synthesis.

This course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3; (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 310.

Recommended Textbook: Foundations for Microwave Engineering, R..E. Collin. McGraw Hill.

Antenna Theory, Constantine A. Balanis, Wiley, John & Sons. Reference Book: Fields and Waves in Communication Electronics, S. Ramo, J.R. Whinnery, Wiley.

Antennas, John D. Kraus, Ronald J. Marhefka, Ronald J. Marhefka, Ronald J. Marhefka, McGraw-Hill.

Radiation mechanism of antenna; basic antenna parameters, Classification of antennas; wire antennas, dipole antenna, array antenna, Yagi-Uda array antenna; Slot, horn and reflector antennas.

Planner antennas: microstrip patch antennas; Design of microstrip and array antennas; Antenna in mobile communication, control of tilt angle and radio coverage.

Lab Work based on the theory course.

Radio propagation characteristics: models for path loss, shadowing and multipath fading; delay spread, coherence bandwidth, coherence time, Doppler spread; Jake’s channel model. Digital modulation for mobile radio: analysis under fading channels; diversity techniques and RAKE demodulator. Introduction to spread spectrum communication. Multiple access techniques: FDMA/TDMA/CDMA. The cellular concept: frequency reuse; basic theory of hexagonal cell layout, spectrum efficiency. FDMA/TDMA cellular system; channel allocation schemes. Handover analysis. Cellular CDMA; soft capacity. Erlang capacity comparision of FDM/TDM systems and CDMA. Discussion of GSM standards; signaling and call control; mobility management; location tracing. Wireless data networking, packet error modeling on fading channels, performance analysis of link and transport layer protocols over wireless channels; wireless data in GSM, IS-95, GPRS and EDGE.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ETE 314.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Modern Wireless Communications, Simon Haykin and Michael Moher, Pearson Education.
  2. Wireless Communications & Networking, J.W. Mark and W. Zhauang, Pearson Education Inc., 2005.

Reference Book: Wireless Communications: Principles and Practice, Theodore S. Rappaport, Prentice Hall.

Characteristics of optical transmission media, optical fibers – propagation and transmission characteristics , loss and dispersion mechanisms, optical sources – principles of operation, modulation characteristics and driver circuits, photo detectors – principles of operation, circuits and performance, post detection amplifiers, fiber optic communication systems and link budget using direct detection, fiber optic connectors, couplers, multiplexers and splices, wavelength converters, routers, optical amplifiers, coherent and WDM systems. This course includes lab works based on theory taught.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 314.

Recommended Textbook: Optical Fiber Communications: Principle and Practice, John M. Senior, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book: Understanding Optical Fiber Communications, A.J. Rogers, Artech House Publishers.

Telephone Switching: Simple telephone connection, introduction to switching and signaling systems, single and multi- stage space switching analysis and design. Time/Digital switching systems, TS, ST, STS, TST systems, concept of packet switching and ATM, practical systems, circuit switching hierarchy and routing, signaling systems – SS7., telephone instruments, pulse and tone dialing, BORSCHT functions, modems, digital subscribers loops, telephone traffic theory. Telephone Networks: Motivation for ISDN, New services, network and protocol architecture, transmission channels, user-network interfaces, service characterization, internetworking, ISDN standards, expert systems in ISDN, B-ISDN, voice data integration.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ETE 314.

Recommended Textbook: Telecommunication Switching Systems and Networks, Thiagaranjan Viswanathan, Prentice-Hall of India.

Reference Book: Signaling in Telecommunication Networks, John G. van Bosse, John G. Bosse, Bosse Van Bosse, John Wiley & Sons.

Queueing Theory: Review of basics of probability theory, Basics of stochastic processes, Markovian stochastic processes in discrete and continuous time, Arrival and service processes in queuing theory; Little’s result. Traffic Flows in Networks: Traffic Units and Parameters, Holding Time and Call Intensity, Offered Traffic and Carried Traffic, Congestion and Delay, Traffic Variations, Subscriber Behavior.Classical Loss Systems: Poisson Traffic Model, Erlang’s Model, Binomial, and Engset’s Models, Limited Availability, and Gradings PJ Formula, Link Systems in Switching Networks, Dimensioning Tables and Charts, Computerized Aids.Delay Systems: Classical Waiting Time Systems, Classification of Queuing Models, Infinite Source Delay-Loss Systems, Limited Source Delay-Loss Systems. Traffic Measurements: Measurements Recommended by ITU-T, Measurement of Holding Times, and Traffic Intensity, Measurement Accuracy. Multi-Dimensional Traffic: Multidimensional Traffic Models, Overflow Traffic Modeling, ATM Traffic Characteristics, and Modeling

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ETE 302.

Textbook:   1. Lecture Notes

Reference Book:

  1. J.H. Hui: Switching and Traffic Theory for Integrated Broadband Networks, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1990.
  2. Saito: Teletraffic Technologies in ATM Networks, Artech House, Boston-London, 1994, 174 pp. Pre-requisite: STA 102 (Probability and Statistics)

Introduction to Voice Over IP: Introduction, Trends in Voice and Data Convergence, The Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), The Voce Over IP Business Case, Emerging Next Generation Carriers, Introduction to Voice Over IP in the Enterprise, Voice Over other Packet technologies, Emerging Voice Transports. Networking Protocols: Introduction to TCP/IP, Routing in IP Networks, Call Control in IP Networks, QoS related Networking Protocols, Examples of Real World LAN/WAN topologies with Voice Over IP services. Voice Encoding Standards: Overview of encoding standards used for Voice Over IP, G.711 Pulse Code Modulation (PCM), Linear Predictive Coders (LPCs), Code-Excited Linear Predictive Coders (CELPCs), G.723.1 and G.729. VoIP Issues: Jitter and Delay in Voice Over IP, Echo Cancellation, Packet Size, Gateway for Voice-to-IP and IP-to-Voice conversations. Real World Implementation Examples: Carrier implementations of VoIP, Enterprise implementations, Vendor offerings – Overview of Cisco’s AVVID architecture and equipment, VoIP in the Enterprise Call Center, Case Study – Voice Over IP in the distributed Enterprise.

Credits : 3; Pre-requisite: ETE 302.

Course overview and history, radio access, modulation, physical layer rudiments, error control, multiple access, TDMA, CDMA. Network layer, protocols, switching, signaling, mobility management, traffic engineering and management. First generation cellular, AMPS, signaling, digital AMPS, network design. Second generation voice systems, speech coding, TDMA/IS-136, CDMA/IS-95, GSM. Mobile data systems, GPRS and EDGE, mobile IP, wireless LANs, CSMA/CD, IEEE 802.11, wireless residential networks, satellite telephony. Cellular Digital Packet Data (CDPD), architecture, MAC protocol, wireless ATM. The 3G and 4G mobiles, UMTS services, architecture and infrastructure. Network operations and traffic control. Security, cryptography, authentication, key management.

The course includes lab works based on theory taught.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 441.

Recommended Textbook: Wireless Communications: Principles and Practice, T. S. Rappaport, Pearson Education.

Satellite Communications, D. Roddy, McGraw-Hill Professional.

Reference Book: 3G Wireless Networks, Clint Smith, McGraw-Hill Osborne.

Satellite Communication System, M. Richharia, McGraw-Hill.

Introduction: Objectives of network planning, procedure of network planning, site survey, site selection.

Propagation Analysis and Coverage Planning: Propagation modeling, multi-path propagation – path loss, path loss corrections, slow and fast fading; connection between coverage and quality of service, link budget; antenna feeder loss, antenna gain, application example.

Capacity Planning: Procedure of capacity planning, frequency reuse, prediction of offered traffic, example of capacity planning.

Radio-Frequency Planning: RF planning for different modulation techniques (GSM and CDMA), cell planning, frequency hopping, coverage interference prediction, frequency planning, interference levels, adjacent channel interference and avoidance, minimum reuse distance, allocation of frequencies, application example.

Advanced Network Planning: Future planning (phase wise), indoor coverage, tunnel coverage.

Radio Network Optimization: Cause and effect of optimization, procedure of optimization, drives tests.

Telecommunication Network Planning Tools: Digital MAP info, path loss, propagation analysis and coverage planning; Hata model and Walfish-Ikegami model, antenna height and topography corrections; frequency allocation, route calculations – comparison of predicted and measured data, simulation of calls along routes.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ETE 441

Recommended Textbook: Advanced Cellular Network Planning and Optimisation: 2G/2.5G/3G Evolution to 4G, Ajay R. Mishra, John Wiley and Sons.

Reference Book: Radio Network Planning and Optimisation for UMTS, Jaana Laiho, Achim Wacker,  Tomas Novosad, John Wiley and Sons.

Introduction. Motivation for IN. Evolution of telecommunication services. Examples of typical IN services.  Basics of IN architecture. Detailed survey of IN services and service features. Typical applications of IN services. Standardization of IN – from CS1 to CS4. IN CS1 conceptual model. Service Plane. Global Functional Plane. Distributed Functional Plane. Physical Plane. Basic Call Process. POIs, PORs and SIBs.  Basic Call State Model (BCSM). Detection points (DPs) and their arming and disarming. IN service creation. Concept of SCE. Service management. IN signaling. INAP, TCAP and SCCP. Survey of ETSI CS1/2 INAP operations. Relationship to the IN CM model. Charging mechanisms and scenarios. Application of IN model to development of GSM services – idea of CAMEL architecture. IN based mobile services and service features. CAP protocol. Evolution of CAMEL. IN CS3 standard. Parlay/OSA API – opening IN infrastructure for third party service providers. IN and IP/Internet – hybrid services. PINT and SPIRITS architecture and reference services. Examples of services – Internet call waiting, click-to-call, click-to-hear content. Interworking of IN architecture with SIP/H.323 environment. IN CS4. Evolution of IN and recapitulation.

Credits: 3; Pre-requisites: ETE 441.

Recommended Textbook: The Intelligent Network Standards: Their Application to Services, Igor Faynberg, Lawrence R. Gabuzda, Marc P. Kaplan, Nittin J. Shah, McGraw-Hill Professional.

Reference Book: CAMEL: Intelligent Networks for the GSM, GPRS and UMTS Network, Rogier Noldus, Wiley, John & Sons.

Review of Network Technologies: Wide Area and Local Area Networks, Ethernet, FDDI, ATM, APPANET. Interworking Concept: Application-Level Interconnection, Network-Level Interconnection, Internet Architecture, and Interconnection through IP routers. Internet Addressing: Universal Identifier Classified addressing scheme, Network Connections, Network and directed broadcast addresses. Address Resolution Protocol: Address Resolution Problem, Types of Physical addresses, Direct Mapping, Dynamic Binding, ARP cache. Reverse Address Resolution Protocol: RARP, Timing RARP Transactions. IP-Connectionless Datagram Deliver: Virtual Network, Internet Architecture, Connectionless delivery system, Purpose of Internet Protocol. IP-Routing IP Datagrams: Routing in the Internet, Direct and Indirect Delivery, Table Driven IP routing, Next hop routing. User Datagram Protocol: UDP, Format of UDP messages, Layering, Pseudo header. Transmission Control Protocol: Reliable Service, Sliding Window, TCP Segment Format, TCP Checksum, Acknowledgements and Re-transmissions, Response to Congestion. Routing in Autonomous System: Static vs. Dynamic interior routes, Routing Information Protocol (RIP), The Hello Protocol, The Open Shortest Path First protocol (OSPF). The Domain Name System: Flat namespace, Hierarchical Names, Domain Name Resolution. Real-Time IP Protocols: Audio and Video transmission and Reproduction, Filter and playback delay, Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP), Streams, mixing and multicasting.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 302.

Recommended Textbook: Computer Networks, Andrew S. Tanebaum, Pearson Education.

Reference Book: Inside TCP/IP, Karanjit S. Siyan, Techmedia.

Object Oriented Concepts: Classes, objects, methods, inheritance, and class methods.

OO Design Techniques: Booch class diagrams, object interaction diagrams, event-based software.

OO Programming in C++: Classes and objects, dynamic storage, input/output classed, operator overloading, inheritance, class and member functions and data, scope rules for members.

OO Programming in JAVA: Java foundation, control flow, abstract classes and packages, exception handling, applets, web based Java application, multithreading.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 105.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Teach Yourself C++, Herbert Schildt, McGraw-Hill Companies.
  2. The Complete Reference Java 2, Herbert Schildt, McGraw-Hill

Osborne Media.

Reference Book: The complete Reference C++, Herbert Schildt, McGraw-Hill Companies.

Abstract data types and data structures, Classes and objects, Complexity of Algorithms: worst case, average case, and amortized complexity. Algorithm analysis. Algorithm design paradigms. Lists: stacks, queues, implementation, garbage collection. Dictionaries: Hash tables, binary search trees, AVL trees, red-black trees, splay trees, skip-lists, B-trees. Priority queues. Graphs: Shortest path algorithms, minimal spanning tree algorithms, depth-first and breadth-first search. Sorting: Advanced sorting methods and their analysis, lower bound on complexity, order statistics.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ETE 105.

Recommended Textbook: Data Structures and Program Design in C, Kruse, Leung and Tondo, Prentice Hall

Reference Book: Data Structure and Algorithms in Java, Robert Lafore, Sams.

Database System Architecture: Three levels of architecture; External level; Conceptual Level; Internal Level; Database Management Systems Introduction to Relational Databases: Relational Model Overview; Optimization, Relations; Views; Domains; Relations. Specification and Description Language (SDL): Formal descriptive techniques; system specifications, types and instances; state machines; blocks, channels and processes; Backus-Naur Form (BNF) and modified BNF; declarations and block interactions; process creation and termination specification; process and communication addressing; timers; procedures, shorthands; drawing & lexical rules of SDL; supported by a number of simple application examples. Relational Algebra; Syntax; Semantics; Operators; Grouping and ungrouping; Functional Dependencies: Basic definitions; Trivial and new trivial dependencies; Closure of a set of dependencies; Closure of a set of attributes. Normal Forms:- INF, 2NF, 3NF, BCNF Nonlossless decomposition and functional dependencies; First Second and Third Normal Form; Dependency preservation; Boyce code Normal Form. Semantic Modeling: E/R Model; E/R Diagrams; Database design with the E/R model. Object Databases: Objects, classes, methods and messages; Inheritance specialization and generalization; Conceptual Object modeling.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 105.

Recommended Textbook: Fundamentals of Database Systems, Elmasri and Navathe, Addison Wesley. Reference Book: Database System Concepts, Abraham Silberschatz, Henry Korth and S. Sudarshan, McGraw-Hill.

Computer Organization: Computer arithmetic, point representations, introduction to CISC processor architecture, instruction set and addressing modes, hardware design principles polling of processors, memory types & interfacing & timing I/O handling, interrupts & DMA & device interfaces – CRT, floppy disk, HDD, optical disk, serial interfaces & data acquisition, software interrupts, memory hierarchy and virtual memory, multiprocessors concept, cache memory, pipelining and introduction to RISC processors, super scalar processors.

Operating Systems: Operating system concepts & architectural support – privileged mode; operating system design and construction techniques; WINDOWS operating system, concepts of  LINUX/UNIX operating systems; kernels; NOS.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ETE 316.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Computer Organization & Design, David A. Patterson and John L. Hennessy, Morgan Kaufmann.
  2. Operating Systems: Design and Implementation, Andrew Tanenbaum and Albert S. Woodhull, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book:

  1. Structured Computer Organization, Andrew Tanenbaum, Prentice Hall.
  2. Operating System Concepts, Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne, Wiley.

Overview of engineering computation algorithms and methods; Issues in engineering computation; Solution to sets of linear equations; Solution of over-determined equations; Polynomial curve fitting; Iterative techniques and applications; Finite difference techniques and applications; Numerical integration; Solution of ordinary differential equations; Solution of partial differential equations; Random number generation. Different applications of numerical methods.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: MAT 205.

Recommended Textbook: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, E. Kreyszig, John Wiley.

Reference Book:  Engineering Mathematics, Neil, Thomson Learning.

Speech Processing: Human speech communication – Speech production/perception/linguistics. Time-Varying Signal Analysis: Short-time Fourier transform, Gabor transform, spectrograms. Quasi-Stationary Analysis: Cepstrum, linear-prediction (AR) and ARMA models. Feature Space Formulation: Mixture-Gaussian model, Fischer discriminant measure, feature transformations – linear and nonlinear. Maximum likelihood classification and pattern matching through dynamic programming; Hidden Markov modeling of speech.

Image Processing: Why Image Processing? Digital image fundamentals, Image transform, Image enhancement, Image restoration, Image compression, Image segmentation, Representation and description, Recognition and interpretation.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ETE 322.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Digital Image Processing , Rafael C. Gonzalez, Richard E, Prentice Hall.
  2. Circuits, Signals and Speech and Image Processing, Richard C. Dorf, CRC Press.

Reference Book: Digital Image Processing Algorithms and Applications , Ioannis Pitas, Wiley-Interscience .

Artificial Intelligence: Artificial Intelligence Techniques: Logic: propositional logic, first order logic, resolution principle. Problem Representation: state-space representation, problem reduction representation. Production System: PS structure, recognition-action cycle, inference directions, blackboard systems, PS implementation. Frame Representation: basic structure, inheritance of properties, slot extension, implementation. Relational Data Model: relational database model, entity and relationship, generalization and aggregation. Search: blind and non-blind searches, depth-first search, breadth-first search, heuristic search, best-first search, optimal search, A search. Implementation Complexity. Major AI programming Languages: LISP and PROLOG. Expert Systems: Basic Principles of Expert Systems. Natural Language Processing, Medical diagnostics, Financial design, and manufacturing planning.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ETE 322.

Recommended Textbook: Computational Intelligence: An Introduction, Andries P. Engelbrecht, John Wiley.

Reference Book: Fuzzy Expert Systems and Fuzzy Reasoning, William Siler, James J. Buckley, John Wiley.

Neurons and neural networks, basic models of artificial neural networks: simple layer perception, feed forward multilayer perceptron, Hopfield networks, competitive learning networks, applications of neural networks for matrix algebra problems, adaptive filtering and adaptive pattern recognition, dynamic system identification, dynamic system modeling using recurrent neural networks, approximation/optimization problems, VLSI implementation of neural networks.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ETE 322.

Recommended Textbook: Understanding Neural Networks and Fuzzy Logic: Basic Concepts and Applications, Stamatios V. Kartalopoulos, John Wiley.

Reference Book: Principal Component Neural Networks: Theory and Applications, K. I. Diamantaras, S. Y. Kung,  John Wiley.

This course provides an overview of robot mechanisms, dynamics, and intelligent controls. Topics include planar and spatial kinematics, and motion planning; mechanism design for manipulators and mobile robots, multi-rigid-body dynamics, 3D graphic simulation; control design, actuators, and sensors; wireless networking, task modeling, human-machine interface, and embedded software. Weekly laboratories provide experience with servo drives, real-time control, and embedded software. The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite:  MAT 104.

Recommended Textbook: Handbook of Industrial Robotics, Shimon Y. Nof , 2nd Edition, John Wiley.

Reference Book: An Introduction to AI Robotics, Robin R. Murphy, MIT Press.

Each student will be assigned a project under the supervision of a faculty member. The student must complete the project within two consecutive semesters. Alternatively, the student may be placed for industrial training/internship for two semesters in an organization of related industry instead of doing Research Project.

Credits: 4; Prequisite: All Required Courses.

Idea of different Number systems; Binary Logic – Basic Boolean operators (AND, OR, NOT); Boolean algebra and logic circuits: De Morgan’s Laws; Karnaugh Maps; Further Boolean operators (XOR, NAND, NOR). Idea of signals and systems; Digital and Analog sources and systems; Block diagram of a basic communication system and functions of its different parts; Basics of the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves; Necessity of modulation, system limitations, message source, transmission media types; Formal definition of information; Fourier series; Idea of spectra of signals; Information data rate and bandwidth of a signal; Channel capacity and ideal communication systems; Basic idea of coding; Concept of telephone switching systems; Basics of telecommunication networks; Idea of different types of telecommunication systems.

Credit: 1; Prerequisite: None.

Recommended Textbook: This is a very basic course and there is no standard textbook for it. Course materials will be collected from various basic texts.

Reference Book: Signals & Systems, S. Haykin and B. Van Veen, Wiley & Sons,

Introduction to HTML: Mark up tags for basic document layout: paragraph tags, headings, ordered and unordered lists, definition lists, nested lists. Tables: cell alignment. Visual effects: logical and visual styles, special characters. Hypertext links: directory paths, links to other documents, links inside documents. Including multimedia objects: images, sound and video.

Programming Language: Concept of programming language and its classification; Programming logic and flow Chart; Structured Programming using C – Constants, variables and data types, arithmetic and logical operation, loops and decision making, user-defined functions, character and strings, arrays, pointers, structures and unions, file management, graphics programming. Programming with C++.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 101.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. HTML: The Complete Reference, Thomas A. Powell, Osborne /McGraw- Hill.
  2. Programming in ANSI C, E. Balagurusamy, McGraw-Hill Education.
  3. Teach Yourself C++, Herbert Schildt, McGraw-Hill Companies.

Reference Book: Schaum’s Outlines Programming with C, Byron Gottfried, McGraw-Hill.

Introduction to Java and JVM, Java and Internet, Java foundation, Control flow, Interface and Polymorphism, Abstract classes and packages, Exception Handling, Applets, Multithreading, Network Programming; Graphics, 2D and 3D API.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 105.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Teach Yourself C++, Herbert Schildt, McGraw-Hill Companies.
  2. The Complete Reference Java 2, Herbert Schildt, McGraw-Hill Osborne Media.

Reference Book: The complete Reference C++, Herbert Schildt, McGraw-Hill Companies.

Circuit Concepts: Active Circuit Elements: Voltage Sources, Current Sources; Passive Circuit Elements: Resistors, Inductors, and Capacitors with their properties; Sign Conventions; Ohm s Law. Network Theorems and Circuit Analysis: Introduction; Kirchhoff´s laws: Kirchhoff´s Voltage Law (KVL), Kirchhoff´s Current Law (KCL); Determination of Sign; Analysis Methods: Branch Current Method, Mesh Current Method; Delta-Star and Star-Delta Transformation; Maxwell s Loop Current Method; Superposition Theorem; Thevenin´s Theorem; Norton s Theorem; Maximum Power Transfer Theorem. A.C. Fundamentals: Equations of Alternating Voltages and Currents; Cycle, Time Period, Frequency and Amplitude of a Wave; Phase Difference; RMS and Average Values; A.C. through Resistance only; A.C. through Inductance only; A.C. through Capacitance only. Series and Parallel A.C. Circuits: A.C. through Resistance and Inductance; A.C. through Resistance and Capacitance; Series R-L-C Circuit; Resonance in R-L-C Circuits; Bandwidth of Resonance Circuit; Parallel A.C. Circuits; Simplification of Parallel R-L-C Circuits. Poly Phase Circuits: Two-Phase system; Three-Phase System; Star Connection System; Delta Connection System; Balanced Star-Delta and Delta-Star Conversations. Transients: Types of Transients; Transients in R-L Circuits (D.C and A.C); Transients in R-C Series Circuits (D.C. and A.C).

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Pre-requisite: None.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Introduction to Electric Circuits, RC. Dorf, John Wiley.
  2. Introduction to Electrical Circuits, Nilsson, Addison-Wesley.

Reference Book: Engineering Circuit Analysis, Hayt & Kemmerly, McGraw Hill.

Data types, abstract data types and data structures; Efficiency of algorithms; Sequential and linked implementation of lists; Linked list and applications; Stacks and queue and applications; Tree representations and traversals, threaded trees, heaps, binary search tree, AVL tree, B+ tree, digital search tree, Tries; Searching, priorities queues, hashing; Graphs, DFS and BFS, shortest path and minimum spanning tree; Garbage collection; Dynamic storage allocation; Internal and external sorting.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 107.

Recommended Textbook: Data Structures and Program Design in C, Kruse, Leung and Tondo, Prentice Hall. Reference Book: Data Structure and Algorithms in Java, Robert Lafore, Sams.

Signals and their properties; Basic operations on signals; Different types of signals; Relation between signals and systems; Linear Time-Invariant Systems: Introduction; Convolution: Impulse Response Representation for LTI Systems; Properties of the Impulse Response Representation for LTI Systems; Differential and Difference Equation Representations for LTI Systems; Block Diagram Representations; State Variable Descriptions for LTI Systems. Fourier Representations for Signals (both continuous-time and discrete-time). Application of Fourier analysis in signals. The Laplace Transform; Transform Analysis of Systems; Applications of Laplace Transform.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: MAT 205.

Recommended Textbook: Signals & Systems, S. Haykin and B. Van Veen, Wiley & Sons.

Reference Book: Signals & Systems, Alan V. Oppenheim, Prentice Hall.

Complexity of Algorithms: worst case, average case, and amortized complexity. Algorithm analysis. Algorithm design paradigms. Lists: stacks, queues, implementation, garbage collection. Dictionaries: Hash tables, binary search trees, AVL trees, red-black trees, splay trees, skip-lists, B-trees. Priority queues. Graphs: Shortest path algorithms, minimal spanning tree algorithms, depth-first and breadth-first search. Sorting: Advanced sorting methods and their analysis, lower bound on complexity, order statistics.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 207.

Recommended Textbook: Data Structures and Program Design in C, Kruse, Leung and Tondo, PrentECE Hall

Reference Book: Data Structure and Algorithms in Java, Robert Lafore, Sams.

P-N Junction Diode: Terminal characteristics and equivalent circuit, application in rectification.

MOSFET: Physical operation, terminal characteristics, operating modes, amplification – biasing, small signal model, gain and MOSFET switch.

BJT: Physical operation, terminal characteristics, operating modes.

Op-Amp: Ideal op-amp, inverting and non-inverting amplifiers, difference amplifier, integrator and differentiator, non-ideal characteristics.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 109.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Microelectronic Circuits and Devices, M.N. Horenstein, Prentice Hall.
  2. The Art of Electronics, P. Horowitz and W. Hill, Cambridge University Press.

Reference Book: Microelectronic Circuits, Sedra and Smith, Saunder’s College Publishing.

Principles of operating systems; Process management, memory management, auxiliary storage management and resource allocation. Operating system design and construction techniques; Concurrent programming, operating system kernels, correctness, deadlock, protection, transaction processing, design methodologies, comparative structure of different kinds of operating systems and other topics.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ICE 245.

Recommended Textbook: Operating Systems: Design and Implementation, Andrew Tanenbaum and Albert S. Woodhull, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book:  Operating System Concepts, Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne, Wiley.

Database System Architecture: Three levels of architecture; External level; Conceptual Level; Internal Level; Database Management Systems. Introduction to Relational Databases: Relational Model Overview; Optimization, Relations; Views; Domains; Relations. Specification and Description Language (SDL): Formal descriptive techniques; system specifications, types and instances; state machines; blocks, channels and processes; Backus-Naur Form (BNF) and modified BNF; declarations and block interactions; process creation and termination specification; process and communication addressing; timers; procedures, shorthands; drawing & lexical rules of SDL; supported by a number of simple application examples. Relational Algebra; Syntax; Semantics; Operators; Grouping and ungrouping; Functional Dependencies: Basic definitions; Trivial and new trivial dependencies; Closure of a set of dependencies; Closure of a set of attributes. Normal Forms:- INF, 2NF, 3NF, BCNF Nonlossless decomposition and functional dependencies; First Second and Third Normal Form; Dependency preservation; Boyce code Normal Form. Semantic Modeling: E/R Model; E/R Diagrams; Database design with the E/R model. Object Databases: Objects, classes, methods and messages; Inheritance specialization and generalization; Conceptual Object modeling.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3 (Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 275.

Recommended Textbook: Fundamentals of Database Systems, Elmasri and Navathe, Addison Wesley.

Reference Book: Database System Concepts, Abraham Silberschatz, Henry Korth and S. Sudarshan, McGraw-Hill.

Introduction to computer and  telecommunication networks; types of switching- circuit message and packet, transmission media characteristics, data communication principles – asynchronous and synchronous, layered architecture for computer networks, 7 layer OSI network model, standards for different layers, RS-232 C, X.21. HDLC, X.25 TCP/IP etc. network topologies, WAN, MAN, Intranet and LAN technology, IEEE 802 standards, ISDN & B-ISDN, frame relay and ATM network, traffic theory and network performance.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prequisite: ICE 209.

Recommended Textbook: Computer Networks, Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book: Data and Computer Communications, Stallings, MacMillan.

Electromagnetism: Orthogonal Curvilinear co-ordinates (Rectangular, Cylindrical and Spherical); Gauss’s theorem, electrostatic potential, Laplace’s and Poisson’s equations, method of images, energy of an electrostatic system; Concept of magnetic field, Ampere’s Law, Biot-Savart law, vector magnetic potential, energy of magnetostatic system, mechanical forces and torques in electric and magnetic fields, solutions to static field problems; solution to Laplace’s equations.

Electrodynamics: Maxwell’s equations, displacement current, equation of continuity, boundary condition; Propagation of uniform plane waves in perfect dielectric and in lossy medium, reflection, refraction, phase and group velocities, transmission line: evaluation of line parameters, design concepts, cutoff frequency, attenuation, dispersion, power handling capacity, traveling waves, standing waves, Smith chart and matching techniques, pulse propagation, radiation concept: elementary dipole, half-wave dipole, radiation patterns, gain, pattern multiplication, basic antennas.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: MAT 205.

Recommended Textbook:

Engineering Electromagnetics, W.H. Hyat, McGraw-Hill.

Reference Book:  Field and Wave Electromagnetics, D.KK. Cheng, Addison Wesley.

Review work on basic digital gates; switching algebra; minimizing functions using maps and combinational circuit analysis. Different logic families, TTL, ECL, NMOS, CMOS, pass transistor logic, combinational logic circuits:- adders/subtractor, demultiplexers, encoders, decoders, ROMs, PLAs etc. sequential logic circuits:- flip flops and latches, shifters, counters, finite state machine – state transition diagrams and state transition tables, memory elements:- ROM, PROM, RAM-SRAM, DRAM. Introduction to VERILOG and FPGA.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 251.

Recommended Textbook: Digital Design, M.M. Mano, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book:  Digital Fundamentals, T.L. Floyd, Prentice Hall.

Stochastic Processes and Signals: Introduction; Definition of random processes and signals; Autocorrelation and cross correlation of random signals; Transmission of a random signal through a linear filter; Power spectral density functions of random signals; White noise; Stationarity; Ergodicity; Gaussian and Poisson processes; Narrow-band noise; Sine wave plus narrow-band noise.

Continuous Wave Modulation and Noise: Introduction, Amplitude modulation and demodulation; frequency modulation and demodulation; Frequency-division multiplexing (FDM); Angle modulation; Noise in CW modulation systems; Noise in linear receivers; Noise in AM receivers; Noise in FM receivers; Phase-locked loop; Nonlinear effects in FM systems; Receiver model; Noise in DSB-SC receivers; Noise in SSB receivers; Noise in AM receivers; Noise in FM receivers.

Pulse Modulation: Sampling process; Pulse-amplitude modulation; Time division multiplexing; Pulse-position modulation; Bandwidth-noise tradeoff; The quantization process; Pulse-code modulation; Noise consideration in PCM systems; Digital multiplexers; Linear prediction; Differential PCM; Delta modulation; Adaptive DPCM.

Signal Space Analysis: Geometric representation of signals; Conversion of the continuous AWGN channel into a vector channel; Likelihood functions; Coherent detection of signals in noise; Correlation receiver; Probability of error.

Credit: 3; Prerequisite: ICE 209.

Recommended Textbook:

Communications System, Simon Haykin, Wiley.

Reference Book:  Digital Communications, John J. Proakis, McGraw Hill.

Baseband Signal Transmission: Power spectral density of different line codes; The matched filter, properties of the matched filter; Error rate due to noise; Intersymbol interference; Nyquist’s criterion for distorsionless baseband binary transmission; Correlative level coding; Baseband M-ary PAM transmission; Digital subscriber lines; Optimum linear receiver; Adaptive equalization.

Passband Signal Transmission: Passband transmission model; Hierarchy of digital modulation techniques; Coherent binary amplitude-shift keying (ASK); Coherent binary phase-shift keying (PSK); Coherent binary frequency-shift keying (FSK); Coherent quadriphase-shift keying (QPSK); Coherent minimum phase-shift keying (MSK); Noncoherent orthogonal modulation; Noncoherent binary FSK; Differential PSK (DPSK); M-ary PSK; M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM); Carrierless amplitude/phase (CAP) modulation; M-ary FSK; Power spectra; Bandwidth efficiency; Synchronization; Multichannel modulation and the idea of OFDM.

Multiple Access Techniques: FDMA, TDMA, Concept of Spread-Spectrum & CDMA. The Course includes lab work based on theory taught

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 312.

Recommended Textbook: Communication Systems, Simon Haykin, Wiley.

Reference Book:  Digital Communications, John J. Proakis, McGraw Hill.

Microprocessor and its Architecture: Internal microprocessor architecture, real mode memory addressing, protected mode memory addressing, memory paging. Addressing Modes: Data addressing modes, program memory addressing modes, stack memory-addressing modes. Data Movement Instructions: MOV, PUSH/POP, load effective addresses, string data transfer, miscellaneous data transfer instructions, segment override prefix, assembler. Arithmetic, Logic and Program Control Instructions: Arithmetic operations, BCD and ASCII arithmetic, basic logic instructions, shift and rotate, string comparisons, the jump group, controlling the flow of assembly language program, procedures, interrupts, machine control instructions. Programming in Microprocessor: Modular programming, using keyboard and video display, data conversions, disk files. 8086/8088 Hardware Specifications: Pin outs and pin functions, clock generators, bus buffering and latching, bus timing, ready and the wait state, minimum mode and maximum mode. Peripheral Interfacing: Parallel versus serial transmission, synchronous and asynchronous serial data transmission, interfacing of hexadecimal keyboard and display unit, CRT terminal interfacing, printer interface, floppy disk interface, DMA controllers. 80186, 80286, 80386, 80486, Pentium and Pentium Pro Microprocessors: Introduction, memory management, special features.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prequisite: ICE 311.

Recommended Textbook: System Design with MC68020, MC69040. 32-bit Microprocessors, A. Noor, Van Nostrand Reinhold.

Reference Book: The Inter Microprocessors 8088/8088, 80186, 80286, 80386 and 80486: Architecture, Programming and Interfacing Techniques, MacMillan.

The z-Transform; Properties of the Region of Convergence; Properties of the z-Transform; Inversion of the z-Transform; Transform Analysis of LTI Systems; Signal representation using unitary transforms, DFT, DCT, Haar and Walsh Hadamard transform, properties of DFT, circular convolution, linear convolution using DFT, overlap add and save methods, FFT, filter structures for IIR and FIR filters, direct form I and II, parallel and cascade forms, frequency sampling structure for FIR filters, linear phase FIR filters, digital filter design techniques, IIR filter design by impulse invariance and bilinear transformation, transformation of digital filters, FIR filter design using windows, MATLAB based examples, introduction to multirate DSP, decimation and interpolation, polyphase decomposition, uniform DFT filter banks, quadrature mirror filters and perfect reconstruction, introduction to finite register length effects on digital filter performance, spectral estimation. The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credit: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 312.

Recommended Textbook: Digital Signal Processing, John G. Proakis, Prentice Hall.Reference Book: Signals and Systems, Ziemer, Tranter and Fanin, Prentice Hall/MacMillan.

Information Theory: Uncertainty, information and entropy; Source coding theorem; Discrete memoryless channels; Mutual information; Channel capacity; Channel coding theorem; Differential entropy and mutual information for continuous ensembles; Information capacity theorem; Rate distortion theory. Error Control Coding: Introduction to error control coding; Review of elements of linear algebra and set theory; Block coding and decoding – algebraic; Cyclic and RS codes; Performance of block codes; Convolution coding and decoding; Types of codes and their properties; Majority logic; Sequential and Viterbi decoding; Interleaving; Multi-stage coding techniques; Punctured and Turbo codes; TCM; System application examples; Idea of cryptography.

Credits: 3; Prequisite: ICE 312.

Recommended Textbook: Communication Systems, Simon Haykins, Wiley.

Reference Book:  Digital Communications, John J. Proakis, McGraw-Hill.

Introduction to the VLSI design flow, unit processes in VLSI (oxidation, diffusion, lithography, ion implantation, metallization, etc,), isolation schemes, bipolar and CMOS processing, analog ICs CMOS OPAMP static and dynamic CMOS/BICMOS and logic PLA circuits, SRAM, DRAM, introduction to mixed signal ICs, basic design methodologies: full custom and semi-custom design, ASIC field programmable devices, optimization at various levels, (algorithmic architecture, logic, circuit, device), simulation and testing, design rules, floor planning, placement, routing and layout, mask making procedure, parasities and other non-idealities, timing issues, clock skew etc, importance of device modeling.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 311.

Recommended Textbook: Basic VLSI Design, Pucknell Eshraghian, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book: Design of VLSI Systems-A Practical Introduction, Linda E.M. Brackenbury, Scholium International, Inc.

Review of Maxwell’s equations and transmission line theory, circuit models. Microwave network analysis: Scattering matrices and mulitport analysis techniques. Impedance Matching: Design of matching networks including lumped elements, stubs and transmission line sections, circuit tuning. Passive Components: Theory of operation, practical design and implementation of power dividers, directional couplers and hybrids, resonators as well as system applications of these devices. Noise and distortion in RF Systems: Theory of noise in RF circuits, distortion of RF signals, dynamic range limitations, effects on channel capacity. Active Circuits: Theory of operation, practical design and implementation of amplifiers for low-noise or power applications, detectors, mixers; Overview of microwave tubes and solid state devices. Non-Reciprocal Devices: Theory of operation and implementation of isolators, circulators and variable attenuators and phase shifters. Microwave Systems: Receiver and system performance calculations, RF link analysis, end-to-end microwave system (“the physical channel”) analysis. Applications: Antennas, propagation and microwave filter synthesis.

This course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 310.

Recommended Textbook: Foundations for Microwave Engineering, R. E. Collin. McGraw Hill.

Reference Book: Fields and Waves in Communication Electronics, S. Ramo, J.R. Whinnery, Wiley.

Radio propagation characteristics: models for path loss, shadowing and multipath fading; delay spread, coherence bandwidth, coherence time, Doppler spread; Jake’s channel model. Digital modulation for mobile radio: analysis under fading channels; diversity techniques and RAKE demodulator. Introduction to spread spectrum communication. Multiple access techniques: FDMA/TDMA/CDMA. The cellular concept: frequency reuse; basic theory of hexagonal cell layout, spectrum efficiency. FDMA/TDMA cellular system; channel allocation schemes. Handover analysis. Cellular CDMA; soft capacity. Erlang capacity comparision of FDM/TDM systems and CDMA. Discussion of GSM standards; signaling and call control; mobility management; location tracing. Wireless data networking, packet error modeling on fading channels, performance analysis of link and transport layer protocols  over wireless channels; wireless data in GSM, IS-95, GPRS and EDGE.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ICE 314.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Modern Wireless Communications, Simon Haykin and Michael Moher, Pearson Education.
  2. Wireless Communications: Principles and Practice, Theodore S. Rappaport, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book:  Mobile Communications Engineering, W. C. Lee, McGraw-Hill.

Characteristics of optical transmission media, optical fibers-propagation and transmission characteristics, loss and dispersion mechanisms, optical sources – principles of operation, modulation characteristics and driver circuits, photo detectors – principles of operation, circuits and performance, post detection amplifiers, fiber optic communication systems and link budget using direct detection, fiber optic connectors, couplers, multiplexers and splices, wavelength converters, routers, optical amplifiers, coherent and WDM systems.

This course includes lab works based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 314.

Recommended Textbook: Optical Fiber Communications: Principle and Practice, John M. Senior, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book: Understanding Optical Fiber Communications, A.J. Rogers, Artech House Publishers.

Telephone Switching: Simple telephone connection, introduction to switching and signaling systems, single and multi- stage space switching analysis and design. Time/Digital switching systems, TS, ST, STS, TST systems, concept of packet switching and ATM, practical systems, circuit switching hierarchy and routing, signaling systems – SS7., telephone instruments, pulse and tone dialing, BORSCHT functions, modems, digital subscribers loops, telephone traffic theory. Telephone Networks: Motivation for ISDN, New services, network and protocol architecture, transmission channels, user-network interfaces, service characterization, internetworking, ISDN standards, expert systems in ISDN, B-ISDN, voice data integration.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ICE 314.

Recommended Textbook: Telecommunication Switching Systems and Networks, Thiagaranjan Viswanathan, Prentice-Hall of India.

Reference Book: Signaling in Telecommunication Networks, John G. van Bosse, John G. Bosse, Bosse Van Bosse, John Wiley & Sons.

Orbits: Kepler’s Laws, Newton’s Law, Orbital ParamECErs, Inclined Orbits, Geostationary Orbit. Space Environment: Mechanical Effects, Atmospheric Effects (Radiation, Ionospheric Effects, Rain Attenuation), Polarisation, Propagation. Link Analysis: Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power, RECEived Signal Power, Noise Power at the rECEiver input, The Uplink, The Downlink, Station-to-station link. Satellite Access: FDMA, TDMA, CDMA, Fixed and on-demand assignment, Random access, Inter-satellite links. Earth Stations: Standards, Antennas, Radio Frequency Subsystem, Communication Subsystem, Network Interface Subsystem. The Payload: Transparent Repeaters, Multibeam Satellite Repeater, Regenerative Repeater, Antenna Characteristics. The Platform: The Propulsion System, The Power Supply (Solar Power Satellites), Telemetry, Tracking and Command, Thermal Control, Satellite Tool Kit (STK). Satellite Installation: Installation in Orbit, Launch Vehicles, Reliability issues, Cost issues, Network

Dimensioning. Satellite ServECEs: Broadcasting Satellite ServECEs (DBS, DVB-S), Integrated ServECEs Digital Broadcasting – Satellite, Fixed Satellite ServECEs (INTELSAT, VSAT), Navigational Satellite ServECEs (NAVSTAR GPS), Earth Resource Satellite ServECEs (Radarsat, NOAA), Mobile Satellite ServECEs, International Space Station. Satellite Internet: TCP/IP, Proposed Systems (DirecPC, Spaceway, StarBand, Skystar Advantage, SkyBridge, Teledesic, Loral Cyberstar, Eutelsat), DVB: Multi-Protocol Encapsulation, ATM connection handover in LEO networks. Introduction to communication using satellites; Kepler’s laws and orbital mechanics, satellite launching, propagation characteristics, frequency spectra and bands, satellites sub-systems, earth station technology, multiple access techniques, applications of GEO, MEO, LEO and V-SATS, mobile satellite communications.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ICE 441.

Recommended Textbook: Satellite Communications, D. Roddy, McGraw-Hill Professional.

Reference Book: Satellite Communication System, M. Richharia, McGraw-Hill.

Basic concepts of cryptography, mathematical overview of number theory, complexity and information theory, simple crypto systems – transpositions, substitution ciphers, homophonic ciphers, polyalphabetic ciphers, rotor machines, crypto analysis principles, private key systems, public key systems, signature systems, hash functions, cryptographic techniques, key sharing mechanisms, access control security policy, systems like Kerberos, fire walls.

The course includes lab works based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 350.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Computer Networks, Andrew S. Tanebaum, Pearson Education.
  2. Data Communications and Network Security, Houston H. Carr and Charles Snyder, Mc Graw Hill.

Reference Book:  Cryptography and Network Security, William Stallings, Prentice Hall.

Orbits: Kepler’s Laws, Newton’s Law, Orbital ParamECErs, Inclined Orbits, Geostationary Orbit. Space Environment: Mechanical Effects, Atmospheric Effects (Radiation, Ionospheric Effects, Rain Attenuation), Polarisation, Propagation. Link Analysis: Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power, RECEived Signal Power, Noise Power at the rECEiver input, The Uplink, The Downlink, Station-to-station link. Satellite Access: FDMA, TDMA, CDMA, Fixed and on-demand assignment, Random access, Inter-satellite links. Earth Stations: Standards, Antennas, Radio Frequency Subsystem, Communication Subsystem, Network Interface Subsystem. The Payload: Transparent Repeaters, Multibeam Satellite Repeater, Regenerative Repeater, Antenna Characteristics. The Platform: The Propulsion System, The Power Supply (Solar Power Satellites), Telemetry, Tracking and Command, Thermal Control, Satellite Tool Kit (STK). Satellite Installation: Installation in Orbit, Launch Vehicles, Reliability issues, Cost issues, Network

Dimensioning. Satellite ServECEs: Broadcasting Satellite ServECEs (DBS, DVB-S), Integrated ServECEs Digital Broadcasting – Satellite, Fixed Satellite ServECEs (INTELSAT, VSAT), Navigational Satellite ServECEs (NAVSTAR GPS), Earth Resource Satellite ServECEs (Radarsat, NOAA), Mobile Satellite ServECEs, International Space Station. Satellite Internet: TCP/IP, Proposed Systems (DirecPC, Spaceway, StarBand, Skystar Advantage, SkyBridge, Teledesic, Loral Cyberstar, Eutelsat), DVB: Multi-Protocol Encapsulation, ATM connection handover in LEO networks. Introduction to communication using satellites; Kepler’s laws and orbital mechanics, satellite launching, propagation characteristics, frequency spectra and bands, satellites sub-systems, earth station technology, multiple access techniques, applications of GEO, MEO, LEO and V-SATS, mobile satellite communications.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ICE 441.

Recommended Textbook: Satellite Communications, D. Roddy, McGraw-Hill Professional.

Reference Book: Satellite Communication System, M. Richharia, McGraw-Hill.

This course introduces technologies for multimedia communications and will address how to efficiently represent multimedia data, including video, image, and audio, and how to deliver them over a variety of networks. In the coding aspect, state-of-the-art compression technologies will be presented. Emphasis will be given to a number of standards, including H.26x, MPEG, and JPEG. In the networking aspect, special considerations for sending multimedia over ATM, wireless, and IP networks, such as error resilience and quality of servECE, will be discussed. The H.32x series, standards for audiovisual communication systems in various network environments, will be described. Current research results in multimedia communications will be reviewed through student seminars in the last weeks of the course.

The course includes lab works based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 322.

Recommended Textbook: Multimedia Communication Systems: Techniques, Standards, and Networks,Rao, Bojkovic & Milovanovic, Prentice Hall.

Reference Book: Multimedia Communications: Protocols and Applications, Kuo, Garcia Luna-Aceves & Effelsberg, Prentice Hall.

Concepts of lines of force, closed electric and magnetic lines, review on Maxwell s equations, transmission lines, short antennas and radiations, examples of short antennas, basic antenna parameters, point sources and array of point sources, self and mutual impedances, reciprocity theorem, loop and helical antennas, folded dipole and Yagi-uda array: Babinet s principle: slot, horn and complimentary antennas, radiation from apertures, ridge and corrugated horns, GTD, reflector antennas, baluns, antenna for mobile communication, antenna measurements.

The course includes lab works based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 310.

Recommended Textbook: Antenna Theory, Constantine A. Balanis, Wiley, John & Sons.

Reference Book: Antennas, John D. Kraus, Ronald J. Marhefka, Ronald J. Marhefka, Ronald J. Marhefka, McGraw-Hill.

Course overview and history, radio access, modulation, physical layer rudiments, error control, multiple access, TDMA, CDMA. Network layer, protocols, switching, signaling, mobility management, traffic engineering and management. First generation cellular, AMPS, signaling, digital AMPS, network design. Second generation voice systems, speech coding, TDMA/IS-136, CDMA/IS-95, GSM. Mobile data systems, GPRS and EDGE, mobile IP, wireless LANs, CSMA/CD, IEEE 802.11, wireless residential networks, satellite telephony. Cellular Digital Packet Data (CDPD), architecture, MAC protocol, wireless ATM. The 3G and 4G mobiles, UMTS services, architecture and infrastructure. Network operations and traffic control. Security, cryptography, authentication, key management.

The course includes lab works based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 441.

Recommended Textbook: Wireless Communications: Principles and Practice, T. S. Rappaport, Pearson Education.

Reference Book: 3G Wireless Networks, Clint Smith, McGraw-Hill Osborne.

Introduction: Objectives of network planning, procedure of network planning, site survey, site selection.

Propagation Analysis and Coverage Planning: Propagation modeling, multi-path propagation – path loss, path loss corrections, slow and fast fading; connection between coverage and quality of service, link budget; antenna feeder loss, antenna gain, application example.

Capacity Planning: Procedure of capacity planning, frequency reuse, prediction of offered traffic, example of capacity planning.

Radio-Frequency Planning: RF planning for different modulation techniques (GSM and CDMA), cell planning, frequency hopping, coverage interference prediction, frequency planning, interference levels, adjacent channel interference and avoidance, minimum reuse distance, allocation of frequencies, application example.

Advanced Network Planning: Future planning (phase wise), indoor coverage, tunnel coverage.

Radio Network Optimization: Cause and effect of optimization, procedure of optimization, drives tests.

Telecommunication Network Planning Tools: Digital MAP info, path loss, propagation analysis and coverage planning; Hata model and Walfish-Ikegami model, antenna height and topography corrections; frequency allocation, route calculations – comparison of predicted and measured data, simulation of calls along routes.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ICE 441.

Recommended Textbook: Advanced Cellular Network Planning and Optimisation: 2G/2.5G/3G Evolution to 4G, Ajay R. Mishra, John Wiley and Sons.

Reference Book: Radio Network Planning and Optimisation for UMTS, Jaana Laiho, Achim Wacker, Tomas Novosad, John Wiley and Sons.

Introduction. Motivation for IN. Evolution of telecommunication services. Examples of typical IN services.  Basics of IN architecture. Detailed survey of IN services and service features. Typical applications of IN services. Standardization of IN – from CS1 to CS4. IN CS1 conceptual model. Service Plane. Global Functional Plane. Distributed Functional Plane. Physical Plane. Basic Call Process. POIs, PORs and SIBs.  Basic Call State Model (BCSM). Detection points (DPs) and their arming and disarming. IN service creation. Concept of SCE. Service management. IN signaling. INAP, TCAP and SCCP. Survey of ETSI CS1/2 INAP operations. Relationship to the IN CM model. Charging mechanisms and scenarios. Application of IN model to development of GSM services – idea of CAMEL architecture. IN based mobile services and service features. CAP protocol. Evolution of CAMEL. IN CS3 standard. Parlay/OSA API – opening IN infrastructure for third party service providers. IN and IP/Internet – hybrid services. PINT and SPIRITS architecture and reference services. Examples of services – Internet call waiting, click-to-call, click-to-hear content. Interworking of IN architecture with SIP/H.323 environment. IN CS4. Evolution of IN and recapitulation.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Pre-requisites: ICE 441.

Recommended Textbook: The Intelligent Network Standards: Their Application to Services, Igor Faynberg, Lawrence R. Gabuzda, Marc P. Kaplan, Nittin J. Shah, McGraw-Hill Professional.

Reference Book: CAMEL: Intelligent Networks for the GSM, GPRS and UMTS Network, Rogier Noldus, Wiley, John & Sons.

Traffic Concepts: Erlang, busy hour, traffic variations, blocking concept. Traffic Classification. Probability concepts, arrival processes. Stochastic processes; Markov Chains, Introduction to queueing. Loss system. M/M/1 queue, Erlang B and C formulas. Sharing systems. Network Models: routers switches. Heavy Traffic Approximations, Fluid Models. Traffic Engineering: Packet Speech Models, Packet Video Models. QoS: IntServ, DiffServ, ATM Traffic Control. Packet Scheduling, Priorities.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ICE 302.

Textbook:   1. Lecture Notes; will be collected from different texts.

Reference Book:

  1. J.H. Hui: Switching and Traffic Theory for Integrated Broadband Networks, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1990.
  2. Saito: Teletraffic Technologies in ATM Networks, ArtechHouse, Boston-London, 1994.

Review of Network Technologies: Wide Area and Local Area Networks, Ethernet, FDDI, ATM, APPANET. Interworking Concept: Application-Level Interconnection, Network-Level Interconnection, Internet Architecture, and Interconnection through IP routers. Internet Addressing: Universal Identifier Classified addressing scheme, Network Connections, Network and directed broadcast addresses. Address Resolution Protocol: Address Resolution Problem, Types of Physical addresses, Direct Mapping, Dynamic Binding, ARP cache. Reverse Address Resolution Protocol: RARP, Timing RARP Transactions. IP-Connectionless Datagram Deliver: Virtual Network, Internet Architecture, Connectionless delivery system, Purpose of Internet Protocol. IP-Routing IP Datagrams: Routing in the Internet, Direct and Indirect Delivery, Table Driven IP routing, Next hop routing. User Datagram Protocol: UDP, Format of UDP messages, Layering, Pseudo header. Transmission Control Protocol: Reliable Service, Sliding Window, TCP Segment Format, TCP Checksum, Acknowledgements and Re-transmissions, Response to Congestion. Routing in Autonomous System: Static vs. Dynamic interior routes, Routing Information Protocol (RIP), The Hello Protocol, The Open Shortest Path First protocol (OSPF). The Domain Name System: Flat namespace, Hierarchical Names, Domain Name Resolution. Real-Time IP Protocols: Audio and Video transmission and Reproduction, Filter and playback delay, Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP), Streams, mixing and multicasting.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 302.

Recommended Textbook: Computer Networks, Andrew S. Tanebaum, Pearson Education.

Reference Book: Inside TCP/IP, Karanjit S. Siyan, Techmedia.

Computer arithmetic, point representations, introduction to CISC processor architecture, instruction set and addressing modes, hardware design principles polling of processors, memory types & interfacing & timing I/O handling, interrupts & DMA & device interfaces – CRT, floppy disk, HDD, optical disk, serial interfaces & data acquisition, software interrupts, memory hierarchy and virtual memory, multiprocessors concept, cache memory, pipelining and introduction to RISC processors, super scalar processors.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 316.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Computer Organization & Design, David A. Patterson and John L. Hennessy, Morgan Kaufmann.

Reference Book:

  1. Structured Computer Organization, Andrew Tanenbaum, Prentice Hall.

Overview of engineering computation algorithms and methods; Issues in engineering computation; Solution to sets of linear equations; Solution of over-determined equations; Polynomial curve fitting; Iterative techniques and applications; Finite difference techniques and applications; Numerical integration; Solution of ordinary differential equations; Solution of partial differential equations; Random number generation. Different applications of numerical methods.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: MAT 205.

Recommended Textbook: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, E. Kreyszig, John Wiley.

Reference Book:  Engineering Mathematics, Neil, Thomson Learning.

Introduction to networking and internet protocols, Complete coverage of the Java networking and I/O APIs, Details of multithreading and exception handling, Byte, Character, Object and Message streams, IP, TCP, UDP, Multicast, HTTP, DNS, RMI, CORBA and Servlets, Fingers, DNS, HTTP, and ping, Clients and Servers, Multiprotocol chat systems and whiteboards.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 302.

Speech Processing: Human speech communication – Speech production/ perception/linguistics. Time-Varying Signal Analysis: Short-time Fourier transform, Gabor transform, spectrograms. Quasi-Stationary Analysis: Cepstrum, linear-prediction (AR) and ARMA models. Feature Space Formulation: Mixture-Gaussian model, Fischer discriminant measure, feature transformations – linear and nonlinear. Maximum likelihood classification and pattern matching through dynamic programming; Hidden Markov modeling of speech.

Image Processing: Why Image Processing? Digital image fundamentals, Image transform, Image enhancement, Image restoration, Image compression, Image segmentation, Representation and description, Recognition and interpretation.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 322.

Recommended Textbook:

  1. Digital Image Processing , Rafael C. Gonzalez, Richard E, Prentice Hall.
  2. Circuits, Signals and Speech and Image Processing, Richard C. Dorf, CRC Press.

Reference Book: Digital Image Processing Algorithms and Applications , Ioannis Pitas, Wiley-Interscience .

Scientific Visualization: An Engineering Perspective; Overview of Computer Graphics for Visualization; Data Analysis for Visualization; Scalar Visualization Techniques; A Unified framework for flow Visualization; Continuous Volume Display; Animation and Examination of Behaviour Over Time; System Aspects of Visualization Application, Visualization Geometry and Algorithm, Surface Extraction, Solid Representation Techniques, CSG, B-Rep, Octree, Modeling Complexity, Application of Visualization to design and Analysis, Research Issues using Solid

Modeling for Visualization.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 275.

Artificial Intelligence: Artificial Intelligence Techniques: Logic: propositional logic, first order logic, resolution principle. Problem Representation: state-space representation, problem reduction representation. Production System: PS structure, recognition-action cycle, inference directions, blackboard systems, PS implementation. Frame Representation: basic structure, inheritance of properties, slot extension, implementation. Relational Data Model: relational database model, entity and relationship, generalization and aggregation. Search: blind and non-blind searches, depth-first search, breadth-first search, heuristic search, best-first search, optimal search, A search. Implementation Complexity. Major AI programming Languages: LISP and PROLOG. Expert Systems: Basic Principles of Expert Systems. Natural Language Processing,

Medical diagnostics, Financial design, and manufacturing planning.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ICE 322.

Recommended Textbook: Computational Intelligence: An Introduction, Andries P. Engelbrecht, John Wiley.

Reference Book: Fuzzy Expert Systems and Fuzzy Reasoning, William Siler, James J. Buckley, John Wiley.

Neurons and neural networks, basic models of artificial neural networks: simple layer perception, feed forward multilayer perceptron, Hopfield networks, competitive learning networks, applications of neural networks for matrix algebra problems, adaptive filtering and adaptive pattern recognition, dynamic system identification, dynamic system modeling using recurrent neural networks, approximation/optimization problems, VLSI implementation of neural networks.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite: ICE 322.

Recommended Textbook: Understanding Neural Networks and Fuzzy Logic: Basic Concepts and Applications, Stamatios V. Kartalopoulos, John Wiley.

Reference Book: Principal Component Neural Networks: Theory and Applications, K. I. Diamantaras, S. Y. Kung,  John Wiley.

This course provides an overview of robot mechanisms, dynamics, and intelligent controls. Topics include planar and spatial kinematics, and motion planning; mechanism design for manipulators and mobile robots, multi-rigid-body dynamics, 3D graphic simulation; control design, actuators, and sensors; wireless networking, task modeling, human-machine interface, and embedded software. Weekly laboratories provide experience with servo drives, real-time control, and embedded software.

The course includes lab work based on theory taught.

Credits: 3; Prerequisite:  MAT 104.

Recommended Textbook: Handbook of Industrial Robotics, Shimon Y. Nof , 2nd Edition, John Wiley.

Reference Book: An Introduction to AI Robotics, Robin R. Murphy, MIT Press.

Telecommunications Switching Systems Fundamentals: Description of services using information flows and SDL diagrams. System Operation: Description of system components; description of system interface; description of use of SDT CASE tool. Organizational Approach: Group organization and tasks; group interaction mechanisms; Gantt chart and deliverables; review; gates; report formats.

The course includes lab works based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 314.

Introduction: Nature of RT systems, RT operating systems, RT programming languages.

C language constructs: Data structures and linked lists. Relation to task management.

RT Objects: Tasks, event flags, shared memory, semaphores, messages, and signals.

Tasks: Co-ordination using event flags; local, public and private event flags; waiting on event flags; event flag management.

Message Buffers and Mailboxes: Reasons to use message buffers; mailbox commands; use of mailboxes.

Semaphores and Controlled Shared Variables: Reasons for using semaphores, semaphore use, control of shared variables.

Task Co-Ordination and Signals: Signaling procedures; task-to-task communications; single sided and double sided co-ordination; other co-ordination methods.

Real-time kernel example:  mC/OS kernel is examined in detail to show how real-time kernel services are implemented.

Debugging Real-time Systems: Debugger task; monitor task; fault codes and exception handling.

Analysis of real-time systems: Reliability models discussed. Basic queuing theory.

Design of Real-time systems: software design models. System specification standards.

The course includes lab works based on theory taught.

Credits: 3(Theory)+1(Lab)=4; Prerequisite: ICE 275.

Each student will be assigned a project under the supervision of a faculty member. The student must complete the project within two consecutive semesters. Alternatively the student may be placed on industrial training/internship for two semesters in an organization of related industry instead of doing Research Project.

Credits: 4; Prequisite: All Required Courses.